Gain new skills while you help transform learning and teaching. Advocacy is fun and empowering, and there are many ways to make a difference. ISTE’s advocacy toolkit offers resources to help you achieve your vision for digital age education.

Get the guide to using ESSA to fund edtech

Written by ISTE's advocacy team, this policy brief helps educators get the most out of Title IV-A of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) by outlining specific actions they can take to advocate for technology as district and state leaders. The informative guide describes in-depth how technology can support many of the allowable uses of the Student Support and Academic Enrichment (SSAE) grant. Each subsection includes: where in ESSA or the in guidance from the U.S. Department of Education a specific use is permitted, research that supports technology integration, and example cases of this approach in action at various organizations and school districts.

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Federal Policy Toolkit

What You Need to Know About ESSA:

FREE WEBINAR: About ESSA

Using ESSA to Fund Edtech: Getting the Most Out of Title IV-A 2018 (PDF)
March 2019 - The introduction of this guide was updated to clarify that, according to the U.S. Department of Education’s Non-Regulatory Guidance on the Student Support and Academic Enrichment Grant, districts cannot spend more than 15 percent of the funds used to support the effective use of technology for “devices, equipment, software applications, platforms, digital instructional resources, [or] other one-time IT purchases.”

Brief Primer on Implementation of Title IV-A of ESSA 2018 (PDF)

ESSA Leadership Whitepaper 2017: 
ESSA, Edtech and the Future of Education. (PDF)

Breaking Down ESSA (PDF)

Title IV Fact Sheet (PDF) 

Title IV Infographic (PDF)

Title II Fact Sheet (PDF)


What You Need to Know About E-Rate:

E-Rate Infographic Poster (PDF)

State Advocacy Toolkit

 

A User’s Guide to Your State Education Leadership
Learn about key stakeholders and organizations in your state and understand their roles and responsibilities to best direct your state advocacy efforts.
 

Public policy statement and advocacy plan template (PDF). Help your organization develop long-term policy priorities and an advocacy plan. Refer to the plan developed by the ISTE affiliate AzTEA for an example.
 

Student Technology Showcase (PDF). This event is a great way to demonstrate to policymakers, staffers and the general public how digital learning is transforming education. Refer to the case study developed by the ISTE affiliate MACUL for an example.
 

ISTE Advocacy Network booth tips (PDF). Successfully host a booth at your organization's conference that will showcase and build momentum for your advocacy efforts.

 

Resources 

Personal advocacy checklist (PDF). Track what you’ve accomplished so far and set your advocacy goals for the future.

U.S. Congress website scavenger hunt (PDF). Have fun while you learn about your U.S. senators and representatives!

State legislator website scavenger hunt (PDF). Go on a hunt to become a well-informed state advocate! 

Meeting and presentation tips (PDF). Learnhow to conduct a meeting with a policymaker or staffer and make your case for ed tech effectively and succinctly.

Templates

Your policy position (PDF). Summarize your policy position in a professional and succinct one-page format.

Digital learning success story (PDF). Clearly articulate your story and share it with key audiences to make the most impact possible.

Elevator pitch (PDF). Use this template when you have only a minute or less to make a powerful case for digital learning.

Press release (PDF). Encourage media coverage of ed tech issues and effectively publicize your events and successes.

Letter to the editor (PDF). Craft a commanding and informative letter that will be prime for publication in your local news outlet.

 

March 2019 - The introduction of this guide was updated to clarify that, according to the U.S. Department of Education’s Non-Regulatory Guidance on the Student Support and Academic Enrichment Grant, districts cannot spend more than 15 percent of the funds used to support the effective use of technology for “devices, equipment, software applications, platforms, digital instructional resources, [or] other one-time IT purchases.