ISTE Standards FOR
EDUCATORS

Empower your practice, spark professional learning goals with the ISTE Standards for Educators

The ISTE Standards for Educators are your road map to helping students become empowered learners. These standards will deepen your practice, promote collaboration with peers, challenge you to rethink traditional approaches and prepare students to drive their own learning. Connect with other educators in the ISTE Standards Community and learn how to use the standards in the classroom with the ISTE Standards for Students ebook.


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The ISTE Standards for Educators

1

Learner

Educators continually improve their practice by learning from and with others and exploring proven and promising practices that leverage technology to improve student learning. Educators:

1a

Set professional learning goals to explore and apply pedagogical approaches made possible by technology and reflect on their effectiveness.

Explore and apply: Learn about, test and add into regular practice a variety of proven, promising and emerging learning strategies with technology.
Pedagogical approaches made possible by technology: Shifts in teaching and learning afforded by digital tools and resources, for example, increased personalization and differentiation; virtual collaboration, either in real time or asynchronously; project-based learning; STEAM; authentic projects with experts or real-world data; providing immediate feedback using digital tools; competency-based assessments and new data analysis tools.

Explore and apply: Learn about, test and add into regular practice a variety of proven, promising and emerging learning strategies with technology.

Pedagogical approaches made possible by technology: Shifts in teaching and learning afforded by digital tools and resources, for example, increased personalization and differentiation; virtual collaboration, either in real time or asynchronously; project-based learning; STEAM; authentic projects with experts or real-world data; providing immediate feedback using digital tools; competency-based assessments and new data analysis tools.

1b

Pursue professional interests by creating and actively participating in local and global learning networks.

Creating and actively participating in: For example, starting social media chats or groups; blogs that encourage discussion; virtual webinars, meet-ups, edcamps or unconferences; collaborative asynchronous writing or working teams.
Local and global learning networks: Virtual and blended learning communities such as social media groups or chats, virtual PLNs, conferences, meet-ups, edcamps and school-based professional learning communities.

Creating and actively participating in: For example, starting social media chats or groups; blogs that encourage discussion; virtual webinars, meet-ups, edcamps or unconferences; collaborative asynchronous writing or working teams.

Local and global networks: Virtual and blended learning communities such as social media groups or chats, virtual PLNs, conferences, meet-ups, edcamps and school-based professional learning communities.

1c

Stay current with research that supports improved student learning outcomes, including findings from the learning sciences.

Stay current with research: Stay current through practices like setting search engine email alerts for specific topics, following thought leaders or key organizations on social media or RSS feeds, attending presentations or webinars and subscribing to edtech research journals or other media sources.
Student learning outcomes: The knowledge, skills and dispositions a learner should have at the end of an assignment or learning unit.
Learning sciences: Interdisciplinary field bringing together findings – from research into cognitive, social and cultural psychology; neuroscience and learning environments, among others – with the goal of implementing learning innovations and improving instructional practice.

Stay current with research: Stay current through practices like setting search engine email alerts for specific topics, following thought leaders or key organizations on social media or RSS feeds, attending presentations or webinars and subscribing to edtech research journals or other media sources.

Student learning outcomes: The knowledge, skills and dispositions a learner should have at the end of an assignment or learning unit.

Learning sciences: Interdisciplinary field bringing together findings – from research into cognitive, social and cultural psychology; neuroscience and learning environments, among others – with the goal of implementing learning innovations and improving instructional practice.

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2

Leader

Educators seek out opportunities for leadership to support student empowerment and success and to improve teaching and learning. Educators:

2a

Shape, advance and accelerate a shared vision for empowered learning with technology by engaging with education stakeholders.

Shape, advance and accelerate a shared vision: How an individual is represented online in the public domain, based on activities, connections or tagging, for example, social media posts, photos, public online comments/reviews, awareness and monitoring of how others are depicting you online.
Empowered learning with technology: Learning where students are self-aware about their own learning preferences and needs and have significant voice and choice in setting learning goals. Empowered students leverage technology to determine how they will learn, demonstrate competency in meeting their goals and reflect on their learning process and outcomes.
Engaging with education stakeholders: Local stakeholders to engage in student learning success include district- and school-level administrators, educators, parents or guardians, community members, school board and state/government members, employers, higher education faculty and staff and, of course, students themselves. Connect with external stakeholders by presenting at national or international conferences, engaging with virtual PLNs and thought leaders, and expressing constituent opinions on education technology policy.
Shape, advance and accelerate a shared vision: How an individual is represented online in the public domain, based on activities, connections or tagging, for example, social media posts, photos, public online comments/reviews, awareness and monitoring of how others are depicting you online. Empowered learning with technology: Learning where students are self-aware about their own learning preferences and needs and have significant voice and choice in setting learning goals. Empowered students leverage technology to determine how they will learn, demonstrate competency in meeting their goals and reflect on their learning process and outcomes. Engaging with education stakeholders: Local stakeholders to engage in student learning success include district- and school-level administrators, educators, parents or guardians, community members, school board and state/government members, employers, higher education faculty and staff and, of course, students themselves. Connect with external stakeholders by presenting at national or international conferences, engaging with virtual PLNs and thought leaders, and expressing constituent opinions on education technology policy.
2b

Advocate for equitable access to educational technology, digital content and learning opportunities to meet the diverse needs of all students.

Equitable access: When all students have access to technology needed for learning and to culturally relevant curriculum and resources regardless of race, ethnicity, socio-economic status, gender identity, sexuality, ability, primary language or any other factor that might hinder or unfairly advantage one student over another.
Educational technology: Devices, apps, webs resources, internet access, technology support and other digital tools used to deepen learning.
Digital content: Digital content may include open educational resources (OERs); digital media and podcasts; digital curriculum, including culturally relevant curriculum; news and other websites; and digitized original or historical resources such as newspapers, virtual field trips or virtual reality (VR) software and devices.
Learning opportunities: Educators plan for learning that accommodates differing access levels and individual student needs, for example, providing homework alternatives for students who do not have internet access at home, providing competency-based or other opportunities to demonstrate learning, scaffolding student learning to challenge and support individual students where they are and advocating for an equitable system for all students.
Diverse needs: Diverse needs might include learner variability; language skills; technology and internet access levels outside of school; cultural specificity and challenges at home such as poverty, homelessness or instability.

Equitable access: When all students have access to technology needed for learning and to culturally relevant curriculum and resources regardless of race, ethnicity, socio-economic status, gender identity, sexuality, ability, primary language or any other factor that might hinder or unfairly advantage one student over another.

Educational technology: Devices, apps, webs resources, internet access, technology support and other digital tools used to deepen learning.

Digital content: Digital content may include open educational resources (OERs); digital media and podcasts; digital curriculum, including culturally relevant curriculum; news and other websites; and digitized original or historical resources such as newspapers, virtual field trips or virtual reality (VR) software and devices.

Learning opportunities: Educators plan for learning that accommodates differing access levels and individual student needs, for example, providing homework alternatives for students who do not have internet access at home, providing competency-based or other opportunities to demonstrate learning, scaffolding student learning to challenge and support individual students where they are and advocating for an equitable system for all students.

Diverse needs: Diverse needs might include learner variability; language skills; technology and internet access levels outside of school; cultural specificity and challenges at home such as poverty, homelessness or instability.

2c

Model for colleagues the identification, exploration, evaluation, curation and adoption of new digital resources and tools for learning.

Identification: Finding new tools or resources to enhance learning by asking or observing colleagues or students, reading related publications and following other educators or thought leaders.
Exploration: Experimenting with new tools and resources for learning and being open to calculated risk-taking and productive failure for continuous learning.
Evaluation: Analyzing and reflecting on the value of a new tool or resource for learning and possible improvements for the next time it is used.
Curation: Thoughtfully organizing resources in a way that is useful and meaningful.
Adoption: Incorporating selected new resources and strategies into regular practice.
New digital resources and tools for learning: These may include OERs; apps, websites and other software; hardware tools and devices; networked devices and the “Internet of Things;” and emerging pedagogies around digital tools and resources.

Identification: Finding new tools or resources to enhance learning by asking or observing colleagues or students, reading related publications and following other educators or thought leaders.

Exploration: Experimenting with new tools and resources for learning and being open to calculated risk-taking and productive failure for continuous learning.

Evaluation: Analyzing and reflecting on the value of a new tool or resource for learning and possible improvements for the next time it is used.

Curation: Thoughtfully organizing resources in a way that is useful and meaningful.

Adoption: Incorporating selected new resources and strategies into regular practice.

New digital resources and tools for learning: These may include OERs; apps, websites and other software; hardware tools and devices; networked devices and the “Internet of Things;” and emerging pedagogies around digital tools and resources.

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3

Citizen

Educators inspire students to positively contribute to and responsibly participate in the digital world. Educators:

3a

Create experiences for learners to make positive, socially responsible contributions and exhibit empathetic behavior online that build relationships and community.

Make positive, socially responsible contributions: For example, engaging productively with others online; sharing creative or intellectual work that is original, protected and documented; being involved in virtual social actions such as crowdsourcing, crowd funding or mobilizing for a cause; using digital tools for entrepreneurship and innovation.
Exhibit empathetic behavior: For example, being civil and humane in online interactions and communications; not trolling or cyberbullying; standing up for others online; and being respectful of others’ perspectives and experiences.
Build relationships and community: Using digital tools to contribute to the common good and build interpersonal bonds.

Make positive, socially responsible contributions: For example, engaging productively with others online; sharing creative or intellectual work that is original, protected and documented; being involved in virtual social actions such as crowdsourcing, crowd funding or mobilizing for a cause; using digital tools for entrepreneurship and innovation.

Exhibit empathetic behavior: For example, being civil and humane in online interactions and communications; not trolling or cyberbullying; standing up for others online; and being respectful of others’ perspectives and experiences.

Build relationships and community: Using digital tools to contribute to the common good and build interpersonal bonds.

3b

Establish a learning culture that promotes curiosity and critical examination of online resources and fosters digital literacy and media fluency.

Establish a learning culture: With students, create shared values, social norms and goals around the purpose and approach to learning in the digital world.
Curiosity: Encourage and support students’ questioning of information and ideas put in front of them and pursuit of their own interests, ideas and hunches.
Critical examination of online resources: Assessing the credibility and usefulness of information found online and in the media, for example, evaluating accuracy of source data, bias and relevance to learning goals; learning to think about and check for personal biases and everyone's tendency to confirmation bias; and varying search terms to find alternative perspectives.
Digital literacy: Being able to use technologies effectively and being able to effectively discover, analyze, create and communicate information using digital tools and resources.
Media fluency: The ability to meaningfully interpret large amounts of complex information in multiple formats and communicate and share across various media formats.

Establish a learning culture: With students, create shared values, social norms and goals around the purpose and approach to learning in the digital world.

Curiosity: Encourage and support students’ questioning of information and ideas put in front of them and pursuit of their own interests, ideas and hunches.

Critical examination of online resources: Assessing the credibility and usefulness of information found online and in the media, for example, evaluating accuracy of source data, bias and relevance to learning goals; learning to think about and check for personal biases and everyone's tendency to confirmation bias; and varying search terms to find alternative perspectives.

Digital literacy: Being able to use technologies effectively and being able to effectively discover, analyze, create and communicate information using digital tools and resources.

Media fluency: The ability to meaningfully interpret large amounts of complex information in multiple formats and communicate and share across various media formats.

3c

Mentor students in safe, legal and ethical practices with digital tools and the protection of intellectual rights and property.

Mentor: Coaching or ongoing guidance that includes modeling of your own practice; sharing with and teaching others; and providing ongoing, productive feedback and advice.
Safe practices: Interactions that keep you out of harm’s way, for example, knowing the identity of who you are interacting with; how much and what kind of information you release online; and protecting oneself from scams, phishing schemes and poor purchasing practices (e-commerce theft).
Ethical practices: Interactions that align with one’s moral code, for example, preventing or not engaging in cyberbullying, trolling or scamming; avoiding plagiarism; and supporting others’ positive digital identity.
Legal practices: Interactions that are mindful of the law, for example, abiding by copyright and fair use, respecting network protections by not hacking them and not using another’s identity.
Protection of intellectual rights and property: Mindful sharing of creative and intellectual work; knowing and using creative commons as well as innate copyright protections.

Mentor: Coaching or ongoing guidance that includes modeling of your own practice; sharing with and teaching others; and providing ongoing, productive feedback and advice.

Safe practices: Interactions that keep you out of harm’s way, for example, knowing the identity of who you are interacting with; how much and what kind of information you release online; and protecting oneself from scams, phishing schemes and poor purchasing practices (e-commerce theft).

Ethical practices: Interactions that align with one’s moral code, for example, preventing or not engaging in cyberbullying, trolling or scamming; avoiding plagiarism; and supporting others’ positive digital identity.

Legal practices: Interactions that are mindful of the law, for example, abiding by copyright and fair use, respecting network protections by not hacking them and not using another’s identity.

Protection of intellectual rights and property: Mindful sharing of creative and intellectual work; knowing and using creative commons as well as innate copyright protections.

3d

Model and promote management of personal data and digital identity and protect student data privacy.

Model and promote: Educators engage in these best practices themselves; bring transparency to them with colleagues, parents, students and other stakeholders; and promote them among students, colleagues and other stakeholders.
Management of personal data: For example, creating effective passwords, authenticating sources before providing personal information, sharing personal data conscientiously, not posting address or phone numbers publicly.
Management of digital identity: How an individual is represented online in the public domain based on activities, connections or tagging through social media posts, photos, public online comments or reviews, and awareness and monitoring of depictions by others.
Protect student data privacy: Actively protecting students’ personal or academic information through such precautions as not sharing student work, pictures or identifying information without permission from students and parents or guardians; being safe when working with student data in public or shared spaces; understanding companies’ privacy and data management policies; and avoiding or gaining permission to use those without strong management and privacy for student data.

Model and promote: Educators engage in these best practices themselves; bring transparency to them with colleagues, parents, students and other stakeholders; and promote them among students, colleagues and other stakeholders.

Management of personal data: For example, creating effective passwords, authenticating sources before providing personal information, sharing personal data conscientiously, not posting address or phone numbers publicly.

Management of digital identity: How an individual is represented online in the public domain based on activities, connections or tagging through social media posts, photos, public online comments or reviews, and awareness and monitoring of depictions by others.

Protect student data privacy: Actively protecting students’ personal or academic information through such precautions as not sharing student work, pictures or identifying information without permission from students and parents or guardians; being safe when working with student data in public or shared spaces; understanding companies’ privacy and data management policies; and avoiding or gaining permission to use those without strong management and privacy for student data.

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4

Collaborator

Educators dedicate time to collaborate with both colleagues and students to improve practice, discover and share resources and ideas, and solve problems. Educators:

4a

Dedicate planning time to collaborate with colleagues to create authentic learning experiences that leverage technology.

Authentic learning experiences: Activities that are based on students’ real-world experiences or current issues, use real data or work to solve real-world problems.

Authentic learning experiences: Activities that are based on students’ real-world experiences or current issues, use real data or work to solve real-world problems.

4b

Collaborate and co-learn with students to discover and use new digital resources and diagnose and troubleshoot technology issues.

Collaborate and co-learn: Reconfigure the teacher-student relationship to encourage modeling and facilitating student learning through relationships built on collaborating and learning together.
Diagnose and troubleshoot technology issues: Able to draw on student and teacher knowledge to solve technology problems and model this practice for students, for example, restart a device, install software updates, transfer work from one device to another, troubleshoot when audio/video won't play and recognize functional similarities between different devices or software.

Collaborate and co-learn: Reconfigure the teacher-student relationship to encourage modeling and facilitating student learning through relationships built on collaborating and learning together.

Diagnose and troubleshoot technology issues: Able to draw on student and teacher knowledge to solve technology problems and model this practice for students, for example, restart a device, install software updates, transfer work from one device to another, troubleshoot when audio/video won't play and recognize functional similarities between different devices or software.

4c

Use collaborative tools to expand students' authentic, real-world learning experiences by engaging virtually with experts, teams and students, locally and globally.

Collaborative tools: For example, cloud-based, shareable documents and calendars; social media; video and audio conferencing software; and email.
Authentic, real-world learning experiences: For example, solving real-world local or global problems, career/workforce related projects and skill-building, design projects and processes.

Collaborative tools: For example, cloud-based, shareable documents and calendars; social media; video and audio conferencing software; and email.

Authentic, real-world learning experiences: For example, solving real-world local or global problems, career/workforce related projects and skill-building, design projects and processes.

4d

Demonstrate cultural competency when communicating with students, parents and colleagues and interact with them as co-collaborators in student learning.

Cultural competency: Being able to interact appropriately and effectively with people from other cultures. Being mindful of others’ experiences and aware of one’s own identity and ideas about difference.
Interact as co-collaborators in student learning: In learning, cultural competency takes the experiences and identities of all parties as a sign of the uniqueness of each class and of each student. Thoughtfulness in designing learning experiences that consider cultural identities can enhance student learning and improve collaboration and communication with parents or guardians and other stakeholders.

Cultural competency: Being able to interact appropriately and effectively with people from other cultures. Being mindful of others’ experiences and aware of one’s own identity and ideas about difference.

Interact as co-collaborators in student learning: In learning, cultural competency takes the experiences and identities of all parties as a sign of the uniqueness of each class and of each student. Thoughtfulness in designing learning experiences that consider cultural identities can enhance student learning and improve collaboration and communication with parents or guardians and other stakeholders.

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5

Designer

Educators design authentic, learner-driven activities and environments that recognize and accommodate learner variability. Educators:

5a

Use technology to create, adapt and personalize learning experiences that foster independent learning and accommodate learner differences and needs.

Personalize learning experiences: Capitalize on technology's efficiencies and functionality to meet students’ individual learning needs, for example, scaled tests and quizzes; adaptability tools and features; software data that can capture where students are struggling or spending the bulk of their time; competency-based learning resources; tools that facilitate student reflection; project planning, organization and time management; communication; collaborative work; individual research and curation; and design and creativity.
Independent learning: Student ownership over their learning goals, demonstration of competency and structuring of work.
Learner differences and needs: Systemic learner variability that, if planned for and supported, maximizes student learning and engagement, for example, differentiation, assistive technologies and accommodations; building motivation to learn by stimulating interest; multimodal content delivery; fostering learner awareness of their work preferences and recognition of how academic work aligns to personal goals.

Personalize learning experiences: Capitalize on technology's efficiencies and functionality to meet students’ individual learning needs, for example, scaled tests and quizzes; adaptability tools and features; software data that can capture where students are struggling or spending the bulk of their time; competency-based learning resources; tools that facilitate student reflection; project planning, organization and time management; communication; collaborative work; individual research and curation; and design and creativity.

Independent learning: Student ownership over their learning goals, demonstration of competency and structuring of work.

Learner differences and needs: Systemic learner variability that, if planned for and supported, maximizes student learning and engagement, for example, differentiation, assistive technologies and accommodations; building motivation to learn by stimulating interest; multimodal content delivery; fostering learner awareness of their work preferences and recognition of how academic work aligns to personal goals.

5b

Design authentic learning activities that align with content area standards and use digital tools and resources to maximize active, deep learning.

Authentic learning activities: Learning experiences that have value or resonance beyond the classroom/academics, for example, solving real-world local or global problems; career-/workforce- related projects and skill-building; wrestling with significant philosophical or intellectual problems; and design projects and processes.
Active, deep learning: Leveraging digital tools and resources so students can gain mastery of content area knowledge while also gaining vital competencies, including problem-solving, critical thinking, effective communication, collaboration, self-direction and belief in their ability to grow and improve with hardwork and perseverance.

Authentic learning activities: Learning experiences that have value or resonance beyond the classroom/academics, for example, solving real-world local or global problems; career-/workforce- related projects and skill-building; wrestling with significant philosophical or intellectual problems; and design projects and processes.

Active, deep learning: Leveraging digital tools and resources so students can gain mastery of content area knowledge while also gaining vital competencies, including problem-solving, critical thinking, effective communication, collaboration, self-direction and belief in their ability to grow and improve with hardwork and perseverance.

5c

Explore and apply instructional design principles to create innovative digital learning environments that engage and support learning.

Instructional design principles: Established and evolving best practices and guidelines for designing learning experiences for targeted learners.
Create innovative digital learning environments: Maximize learning by designing effective instruction in a variety of learning environments and rethinking physical space to enhance new models of classroom learning such as blended learning, online learning and various device models such as 1:1 tablets or laptops, mobile devices and computer labs.

Instructional design principles: Established and evolving best practices and guidelines for designing learning experiences for targeted learners.

Create innovative digital learning environments: Maximize learning by designing effective instruction in a variety of learning environments and rethinking physical space to enhance new models of classroom learning such as blended learning, online learning and various device models such as 1:1 tablets or laptops, mobile devices and computer labs.

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6

Facilitator

Educators facilitate learning with technology to support student achievement of the ISTE Standards for Students. Educators:

6a

Foster a culture where students take ownership of their learning goals and outcomes in both independent and group settings.

Foster a culture: Creating shared values, social norms and goals around the purpose and approach to learning by, for example, bringing students into the process of establishing and maintaining culture; setting up space and time for students to fail and try again; establishing space and time for student reflection and goal setting; allowing students voice and choice in demonstration and evaluation of competency.
Independent and group settings: Individual or collaborative group work, conducted online, face to face or hybrid.

Foster a culture: Creating shared values, social norms and goals around the purpose and approach to learning by, for example, bringing students into the process of establishing and maintaining culture; setting up space and time for students to fail and try again; establishing space and time for student reflection and goal setting; allowing students voice and choice in demonstration and evaluation of competency.

Independent and group settings: Individual or collaborative group work, conducted online, face to face or hybrid.

6b

Manage the use of technology and student learning strategies in digital platforms, virtual environments, hands-on makerspaces or in the field.

Use of technology and student learning strategies: Keep students supported, on task and learning in a variety of face-to-face, digital or hybrid environments.

Use of technology and student learning strategies: Keep students supported, on task and learning in a variety of face-to-face, digital or hybrid environments.

6c

Create learning opportunities that challenge students to use a design process and computational thinking to innovate and solve problems.

Design process: A methodology for problem-solving; a series of steps used to solve a problem and design a solution. For example, human-centered design process, project-based learning, engineering design processes and scientific method.
Computational thinking: A problem-solving process that includes, but is not limited to, the following characteristics: formulating problems in a way that enables us to use a computer and other tools to solve them; logically organizing and analyzing data; representing data through abstractions such as models and simulations; automating solutions through algorithmic thinking (a series of ordered steps); identifying, analyzing and implementing possible solutions with the goal of achieving the most efficient and effective combination of steps and resources; and generalizing and transferring this problem-solving process to a wide variety of problems.

Design process: A methodology for problem-solving; a series of steps used to solve a problem and design a solution. For example, human-centered design process, project-based learning, engineering design processes and scientific method.

Computational thinking: A problem-solving process that includes, but is not limited to, the following characteristics: formulating problems in a way that enables us to use a computer and other tools to solve them; logically organizing and analyzing data; representing data through abstractions such as models and simulations; automating solutions through algorithmic thinking (a series of ordered steps); identifying, analyzing and implementing possible solutions with the goal of achieving the most efficient and effective combination of steps and resources; and generalizing and transferring this problem-solving process to a wide variety of problems.

6d

Model and nurture creativity and creative expression to communicate ideas, knowledge or connections.

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7

Analyst

Educators understand and use data to drive their instruction and support students in achieving their learning goals. Educators:

7a

Provide alternative ways for students to demonstrate competency and reflect on their learning using technology.

Alternative ways to demonstrate competency: Alternatives for how students demonstrate knowledge, skills and dispositions might include students exhibiting competency in a final project or presentation; using an e-portfolio system that manages student artifacts and reflections; and allowing students to choose their pathway for learning and when they show competency rather than forcing all learners into the same pace or schedule.
Reflect on their learning: Use digital tools to reflect on the process of learning, successes and areas for improvement, and to set goals for future adjustments to improve learning focus, process or approach.

Alternative ways to demonstrate competency: Alternatives for how students demonstrate knowledge, skills and dispositions might include students exhibiting competency in a final project or presentation; using an e-portfolio system that manages student artifacts and reflections; and allowing students to choose their pathway for learning and when they show competency rather than forcing all learners into the same pace or schedule.

Reflect on their learning: Use digital tools to reflect on the process of learning, successes and areas for improvement, and to set goals for future adjustments to improve learning focus, process or approach.

7b

Use technology to design and implement a variety of formative and summative assessments that accommodate learner needs, provide timely feedback to students and inform instruction.

Formative assessments: For example, apps that take real-time measures of knowledge and understanding through surveys or embedded questions; recording software that allows students to reflect on or explain their thinking; sites and apps where students respond to discussion or reflection questions; and backchannel chats or messaging systems that allow students to ask questions or clarify for each other.
Summative assessments: For example, tests that allow for visual, interactive or other responses as an alternative to traditional testing questions; performance-based assessments that showcase knowledge, process and thinking; portfolios, videos or competency-based assessments that can be completed and evaluated when students feel ready; and tools that differentiate for students of differing abilities.
Accommodate learner needs: Account for and understand diverse student learning needs to support the success of all learners.
Timely feedback: Feedback that maximizes digital tools to provide students substantive feedback as quickly as possible. Examples include built-in data capturing of assessment systems and other digital tools; modeling how to understand and use tool-embedded feedback mechanisms such as "help" tips, error notifications and gamified success or failures; using commenting tools or audio and video tools to provide direct feedback on student work.
Inform instruction: Analyzing assessment data to adjust current instruction or iterate on future instruction. Applies to both class-wide and individual student instruction approaches.

Formative assessments: For example, apps that take real-time measures of knowledge and understanding through surveys or embedded questions; recording software that allows students to reflect on or explain their thinking; sites and apps where students respond to discussion or reflection questions; and backchannel chats or messaging systems that allow students to ask questions or clarify for each other.

Summative assessments: For example, tests that allow for visual, interactive or other responses as an alternative to traditional testing questions; performance-based assessments that showcase knowledge, process and thinking; portfolios, videos or competency-based assessments that can be completed and evaluated when students feel ready; and tools that differentiate for students of differing abilities.

Accommodate learner needs: Account for and understand diverse student learning needs to support the success of all learners.

Timely feedback: Feedback that maximizes digital tools to provide students substantive feedback as quickly as possible. Examples include built-in data capturing of assessment systems and other digital tools; modeling how to understand and use tool-embedded feedback mechanisms such as "help" tips, error notifications and gamified success or failures; using commenting tools or audio and video tools to provide direct feedback on student work.

Inform instruction: Analyzing assessment data to adjust current instruction or iterate on future instruction. Applies to both class-wide and individual student instruction approaches.

7c

Use assessment data to guide progress and communicate with students, parents and education stakeholders to build student self-direction.

Student assessment data: Information from both formative and summative assessments about student strengths, gaps, preferences and current achievement that can be used to adjust and enhance individual student learning.
Student self-direction: Student ownership of learning goals, process and demonstrations of competency that can be enhanced with transparency and knowledge of how to capitalize on assessment data from teachers, administrators, parents or guardians and students themselves.

Student assessment data: Information from both formative and summative assessments about student strengths, gaps, preferences and current achievement that can be used to adjust and enhance individual student learning.

Student self-direction: Student ownership of learning goals, process and demonstrations of competency that can be enhanced with transparency and knowledge of how to capitalize on assessment data from teachers, administrators, parents or guardians and students themselves.

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ISTE Standards for

Educators